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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)
's at the top of the hour, you do not want to miss it. now to taxes and what we're calling many state by state tax revolt. five states are looking to eliminate state income taxes for people and corporations, they are louisiana, kansas, north carolina, oklahoma, and nebraska. if you wouldn't know it, the governor of nebraska, david henman is here and he's going to explain. thanks for joining us this morning. all of a sudden, did these states have the same epiphany or the same realization that there's only way to get the local economies going and that would be to change their taxes? >> well, i would tell you, charles, we have all looked at the economy that we're competing in, which is worldwide, and we know we need to be more tax competitive. i want to create more jobs in this state, our state, for citizens and higher paying jobs and the way to do that is to have lower income tax rates and corporate rates and in our particular case, i'm proposing the complete elimination of the income tax and the corporate tax rate. we do that by repealing some of the sales tax exemptions that we've granted over
neighborhoods. let's remember that. but still some homeowners find that they owe back property taxes and maintenance fines on a home they thought they'd lost. maria? >> all right, diana. stay there. we want to get reaction now within real estate from real estate attorney sherry oliphson. good to see you. >> thanks. >> should a process be in place to avoid the zombie foreclosures? >> well, absolutely. i mean, we've learned through this crisis that foreclosure litigation is unlike any other litigation. we have time frames as a result of the robosigner and others that diana referenced for banks to complete short sale processes and notification requirements 37 and these other requirements if foreclosures are not going to be pursued need to be enforced. not only for the homeowners but also for the neighbors and for investors in those banks. we're talking about as many as 2 million mortgages that are in zombieland. who knows what financial impact that's going to have when it shows up on the bank's books? >> sure which is what diana was reporting. should the banks have a time limit to decid
taxes as the most important issues facing american small businesses and that's double the response for any other issue. the next two were government and relagz. in other news, walmart will announce a plan to hire every veteran that applies for a job. the only requirement? the vets need to have retired from the military within the last year. >>> the house will begin to debate on a $51 billion plan for superstorm sandy victims. more than 90 amendments will be filed by friday. earlier this month, lawmakers approved $9.7 billion to help pay flood insurance claims from the storm. the senate is expected to pick up whatever legislation the house approves, but things are getting testy at this point. you are talking about over 75 days i believe at some point since the storm actually came through. governor chris christie of new jersey has been making harsh comments about how you will not expect in the past of seeing any of the representatives from this area of the country who were voting down bill toes help aide flood and victims in iowa. he doesn't want to see breaking down into you scratch
until after april 6th. that's when the top income tax rate in the country will drop the 45% from 50. the strategy relates to bonuses that were deferred from 2009, 2010 and 2011. goldman brought forward payments of deferred stock to executives in the united states to 2012 in order to beat tax hikes implemented for top earnses in 2013. we will talk more about bonus season later today with alana einstein. >> it shows you how crazy it is when all of these countries have moving targets for taxes. everybody plays around the corners and tries to evade as much as they can. >> i guess al jazeera gore missed by a day. >> you're saying he should have sold? >> he's trying hard but, anyway, he's worth more than romney now. >> i did hear that. >> how much is he worth? >> like 100 million from selling his left wing green outfits to the -- one of the biggest oil -- i love him. anyway, yeah, i don't want him to blow it all on food and stuff like that. >>> and swatch is buying the luxury jewelry arm of harry winston for $750 million in cash. swatch is the biggest watchmaker by sales and the latest de
case or hurt his cause? we will get reaction. dagen: and intimate the state income tax. one governor laid out his case, and wayne rogers likes the idea. top of the hour, nicole petallides is covering it for you o on the floor of the new yk stock exchange. nicole: the market is likely to the downside. the trend has been the major market averages are not too far off the unchanged line. see the dog over the unchanged line 50 times in one day is not unusual to see that, however the trend had been to the upside looking like nine trading weeks we have seen the s&p 500 now hovering around the five year highs. dow jones industrials as well and the nasdaq composite as well. intel weighing on the major averages, you can see down 6.25%. if you took out intel out of the dow, the dow would be flat right now. they came up with profits that were disappointing, weak outlook. not good news for intel weighing on the major averages, but technology in general. back to you. dagen: forget about washington. our next guest says stop talking about it, investors should be focused on making money in the econom
in the united states doesn't have a lot of influence on the economy, but the tax hike on the working men and women, 120 million people, that 2% payroll tax is a killer, and that is all consumption of some. people spend the mone money thet have it, they reach into savings. that was a mistake, it was bad policy. i took growth down in the u.s. by half a point. lori: and you are telling us the economy has all the potential to break out. how much o ahead when will this fiscal policy have? is there any way to recoup it? any offsetting factor? >> unless washington changes its behavior. which is not likely. then the answer is no. we have this gradual recovery. it looks all right over time, has good pieces to it, energy, housing, the banking sector actually may be getting better. lori: must be a mistake on our washington leaders, what if they can achieve a grand bargain, get entitlement reform and we can sustain this debt to gdp level for the time being we can get to underlining measures. >> it would be a glorious outcome. lori: are you optimistic at all it will happen? >> i would like it to happ
phone 5 sending shares below. >> did you see your paycheck on friday? the payroll tax hike obviously kicking in for many americans. felt like a pay cut. will this be a temporary shock or a headwind as stocks hover at five-year highs. >> ubs achoirs tnt after a commission throws up road blocks. >>> to the top story. in the pre-market, we've seen apple shares fall below $500 for the first time in 11 months. the tech giant has cut its orders for iphone 5 components because of weaker than expected demands. screen orders for january to march quarter have fallen about half. the company had planned to order. apple said to cut orders for components other than screens. now, jim, we've had sort of this concern about demand for the iphone 5. i think last week when deutsche bank came out with the note from the japanese team, specifically citing this very issue, that's when the concerns really started to mount and the stock really started feeling the impact. >> i think that there's something wrong with the iphone 5. i think that samsung has come on very strong. when you go to a resaler, the sales
to eliminate all state, personal, and corporate income tax does. the plan is to make louisiana more business friendly. no better way than to drop taxes it could be in response to the neighbor taxes which has had no income tax for years. they rely on a windfall from the rich energy resources as well as other forms of taxation, including a sales tax. political analysts are warning the proposal to eliminate income tax could be followed by a plan to raise the sales tax. the office responded to the claim saying only he wants to keep the sales tax as low as possible. well, from texas to investment, it is a mad-toward equity mutual funds in the new year. inflows for the first week reaching $22 billion in his second highest level in history and the highest in 11 years. emerging-market equity funds saw the biggest inflow reheat to cover teeseven and a half billion. ceo of edelman financial services joins me now. when regular investors finally get interested in equity says it mean it is almost over? >> ordinarily i would agree it to my yes, it does, but not this time. you know why? it has been five ye
worries about higher taxes. consumption makes up 70% of the u.s. economic growth. the debt ceiling debate, presidential report card and quiet market rally. what does it mean for you money? joining us right now, jared bernstein, center on budget and policy priorities and chief economist to vice president biden. also with us, russ koesterich. thanks for joining us. >> thanks, maria. >> russ, let me kick it up with you. a pretty good rally. on thursday the s&p 500 hitting yet another five-year high. is this rally for real? do you think it's sustainable going forward as we continue through this earnings period? >> i think in the short term, it is. i think we're probably going to hit a road bump in february. the reason i say that is we've got a lot of flows coming into the market early in the year. people were nervous in december. they're coming back in to stocks. that's a good thing over the longer term. we do have some issues coming up. the debt ceiling obviously one of them. the second question is we start to get the economic data. how big of a hit from the tax increaseses, payroll tax holi
as it comes with curbing loopholes and tax reductions for wealthier individuals. congress should just do it. back to you. connell: let's bring in dylan glenn. former advisor to george w bush. rich said that republicans have reasons for not having this meeting today. the president is standing back and think i am not negotiating on this and the republicans are all over the map. >> i do not think that this is a big deal. i do not see that as a big issue. what is coming out of this weekend retreat is far more important. connell: i would like to be a fly on the wall for that. >> also what is important is to remember how we got here. he has run trillion dollar deficits for the past four years of his administration. you have to pass a budget in the united states senate. he will be doing his sort of constitution getting a budget up to the congress. this is a challenge. we have to have a clear look at how we can reduce spending in this country. connell: whenever the limit is actually reached and it is not raised. then you start to play the political blame game. pay some bills and not others. though
debate, it can be far harder to solve than the taxes, we think the market can be down for a while, and before it comes back up. >> so you're looking for a decline, and perhaps that is an entry point for some. do you agree with that? >> i think any decline is an opportunity to buy, maria. i'm very, very bullish on u.s. equities and one of the main reasons i am the u.s. energy story which i think is a story that's not being told as well as it should be. in 2012 the u.s. oil production was up 16%. that was the biggest year over year increase in u.s. oil production since 18 at which just happens to be when we started producing oil so if we think about what's going on. we have right now -- right now we produce oil at 80%, the same price the rest of the world does. we produce natural gas at 25% of the price the rest of the world does. we have cheap energy here in the united states and we feel that will drive manufacturing back to the united states, create jobs, and when all this political stuff is over, that's going to be a big story that we'll talk about ten years from now. >> these ar
and but budget cuts and tax hikes that have already been put in place. are these guys making more sense than usual? >> i think the resolution of the fiscal cliff us a little bit further toward debt sustainability. going back to 2011, we needed about $4 trillion over a ten-year period 10 year period of time. we are about halfway there with the agreements that have been put in place so far. the question is are we going to go further or not. >> to these guys scare you? >> they make me uncomfortable. the economy needs certainty and 30 end fiscal policy and it seems like we are still hearing a lot of noise if we are watching lot of nothing as usual in washington dc. i'm also hearing a lot of nothing from the businesses here, to be very candid about it. we are hearing a lot of whining and moaning and excitement from the business sector about innovation and new markets and new strategies. but there is a lot of potential besides cost cutting, port. >> the earnings in the corporate sector very high right now. we are seeing earnings decelerates him, and that is likely going to be continued if we don't
in the capital gains tax, which didn't come to fruition, but nevertheless, prudent visitorinvestors sold the stock. and from that standpoint, the stock attracts current levels, especially out of earnings. >> susie: and earnings are coming out next week, and we'll be tracking that. and we'll see how the stock does after that. thanks, david, david garrity. >> tom: investors sorting through a slew of economic data today. u.s. industrial production hit its highest point in more than four years in december, while consumer prices, were flat last month, pointing to muted inflation pressures. still, the u.s. major averages ended mixed: the dow off 23 points, pulled lower by weakness in boeing shares, the nasdaq rose six, the s&p up just a fraction. >> susie: and the federal reserve's latest snapshot of the u.s. economy isn't picture perfect, but it is positive. today's beige book report showed signs of solid overall economic growth. each of the fed's 12 districts showed either "moderate" or "modest" growth, steady or expanding real estate activity, and some growth in consumer spending from decem
not want to do it. he actually does want to negotiate on spending and tax reform. what he does not want to do is have that take place when the republican position on the debt takes the economy hostage. that is off the table. i think the president is smart to be firm and clear on that. next time it would be democrats if we had a republican president. ashley: would you agree, i know it is out of your area, but the senate has not passed a budget in four years now. would you agree with republicans that it is not the way to go and i could, in fact, be breaking the law without i do agree with them. we actually have not passed the budget. i am with them on this concern about our inability to actually do the basic work that a legislature must do. ashley: i know bernanke, timothy geithner, rating agencies and many more states what is the point of a debt ceiling? we routinely raise it anyway. what is the purpose? >> there is no purpose. the debt ceiling has become a device for fiscal irresponsibility. republicans and democrats both dated. senator obama voted against the debt ceiling increase. if
the republicans stand for, small government, low taxes, growth. there are other conservative voices calling for a broader base, rain in the right and make a direct appeal to women and minorities, retreat on social issues like gay marriage, abortion, legalize marijuana, they want compromise, at reach, inclusion and a smaller voice on contentious issues. personally i think conservatives should change the tone. enter over the election turns people off. name-calling is a loser. smile, persuade. a party of growth and optimism will surely have its place in the sun. all right, we're going to talk more about the direction of the gop in a moment but we have this breaking news. the federal reserve has released a load of documents from several closed-door meetings that it had in 2007 as the financial crisis was just getting rolling. among the in relation being released, the minutes from three emergency sessions that the fed at a time when the economy was i'm going to say, adding. there could be some dramatic exchanges, how often insiders says there had to be embarrassing stuff in there. if there wasn'
more. you do not want to miss lou dobbs coming up with his take of the situation as well. lori: one tax stock or company helping you file your tax returns is hitting a 52-week high. is there more upside the head? melissa: and retirement age racing. they plan to increase the retirement age to 70. a look at metals as we head out to break. gold trading higher by half a percentage point. copper leading the way from a percentage point of view. we will be right back. melissa: as with every 15 minutes, let's check the market. nicole is watching. nicole: i am, indeed. this is a name that has headlines and number one performer in the s&p 500 today. stellar performance, up 9.5%. there is quite a bit going on with cbs. they're turning their north and south american outdoor advertising divisions, putting some billboard divisions up for sale. one analyst says a split could unload asset values between 5,000,000,006,000,000,000. here is a one-year chart that shows you how well they set up for the one-year period the tenure charge shows how we went through the crisis. recouped all those losses and stil
that fiscal cliff deal where dividend taxes just went to 20%. a lot of upset and anticipation that it would go higher but 20% is a great number. >> exactly. >> steven hammer, setting some highs of the day right now. you're bullish at least for the short-term here, how much higher do you go? >> i have no doubt in the next six months. we could potentially see anywhere from a 5% to 10% increase in the u.s. stock market, but we need to be cautiously optimistic, and to us it's all about earnings and it's all about volatility which is why we wait based on risk, and investors need to be cautious to where they invest money and they still need to stick with quality. >> okay. hank smith. what's going to take us to these new highs, do you think? >> well, look, i think we've seen in the beginning of this year finally some money coming out of bond mondayfunds going i equity funds. for five years it's been just the opposite so perhaps we're at the very beginning of what could be a very powerful trend providing a ton of fuel to the equity markets, and we agree. look, dividends are still very attractive, as l
to pay a new tax and there is a tax on those who speculation on industrial properties. seng wun, some people are pointing to what is happening with japan as inciting more capital inflows into places like singapore. do you expect more measures in response? >> i think the policymakers here in singapore, we have seen the hong kong government trying to attempt with limited success to hold on property prices here. we have seen inflows. if you look at the last few weeks, we are very strong close into the equity market and given that this region is still set to be likely to lead growth in the coming over 12 months or so itself, that's likely a gain to bring more money. unless, of course, we see a strong turn around in growth in europe and the u.s., but from the medium term itself, when you've got growth and you've got employment opportunity, you've got income growth and environment of very low interest rate is headache to policymaker in which i think the government here continue to have to fine tunemakers every now and then essentially because after they tighten one time, they quiet down the
taxes up to the level where you fund the promises that we've already made. the entitlements that we've already made and the guarantees we've made, they just want to raise taxes on somebody. i don't know who, to the point where we never actually reform medicare, medicaid or social security. >> the question i want to ask him, is there ever a time that he's making, is it now given where we are in the economy? >> well, the question is, you put in a hundred and you take out 400 in medicare and the government covers 300. >> and it makes no sense. >> well, no, but there are people that think that the government's roll is to provide that 300. and so we should raise taxes to the point where you -- it doesn't matter that you -- >> right. >> it doesn't matter. that is the redistribution. >> that's the agal tearan notion or the equality, the fairness in outcome. >> i'll give it to him. we'll ask the question. >> i just hope you got fired up watching lance. >> i'm fired up watching lance. i'm fired up for that interview. >> i can tell he hurt you. i could tell from when you were over there, you
million r tax adjustment and $376 million from something and $700 million from reduced mortgage loan loss. jamie dimon said challenges still exist but as we look forward to 2013 -- let me finish this thought, we look forward -- we remain optimistic. we're committed to doing our part to speed the recovery of the housing market and we continue to see favorable credit conditions across our wholesale loan portfolios. at first blush. go ahead, andrew. introduce chris. >> chris whalen is here to respond to these numbers. i'm here to say they also put out on their website today. what do you make of these numbers? >> similar to welles making up a lot of earnings numbers with cost cutting, very important. a little light on revenue, i think the story of most banks going into 2013. my guess is interest margins continuing to squeeze because of the fed. >> that's not going to get better. >> the benefit from the fed has gone by on net and tt an alarmi rate and the time's gone >> what's your thoughts on loan growth. >> as jamie said he's trying hard to put on assets, everyone in the industry is. but wit
jersey and connecticut, these three states pay almost 16% of the taxes collected in the united states of america. >> some house conservatives favored amendment offered by south carolina mick mulvaney to pay for $17 billion in disaster relief cutting discretionary spending across the board by 1.63%. >> it's important to me that the money goes to the folks who need it very badly. it's so important to me,be that i think we should pay for it. >> the amendment failed. key new york democrat says paying for disaster relief cutting elsewhere would be a first. sandy victims should get their aid. >> i wantbe to repeat this point again. united states of america we respond to disasters. all americans respond to disasters. we don't ask for off-sets. >> with the nation's debt at $16 trillion and counting, conservatives say it isn't about bashing the northeast. it is about saving the country. >> we have to get this under control. most conservatives believe we have to come to a point where we stand and fight. i hope this is the time. >> after president obama said it would be irresponsible and absurd
at their check. i guess it was last week, when they saw the big cut in the social security payroll tax. it was a jump. you have less money now. so many things are affected unfortunately. coming into february, here we are again going to be with spending cuts going to kick in officially. all of this will affect unfortunately the markets. it will be a little rough. the economy is fragile. don't get a deal, jenna. you're looking at recession. fitch knows that. investors know that. we're watching it here at fox business. a little rough. jenna: all right. those are the stakes, recession or not. we'll watch this very closely over next couple weeks. cheryl, thank you. >> you bet. jon: after weeks of delay, secretary of state hillary clinton will testify on capitol hill about the benghazi attack on january 23rd. the secretary will face some tough questions from the house foreign affairs committee about the assault in september that left four americans dead including u.s. ambassador chris stevens. miss clinton was set you would to testify last month but she suffered a concussion falling during i
country and does washington have enough? how much more must they take from the hard-working americans, tax paying americans who are trying to put their life together every day. i and my colleagues who spoke earlier today believe that washington has enough. we don't need to give her more. mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. thank you. the chair: under the speaker's announced policy of january 3, 2013, the gentleman from california, mr. garamendi, is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the minority leader. mr. garamendi: i thank you, mr. speaker. it's good -- it is very, very good that the new 113th congress acted today to reach out in sympathy, compassion and with real support to the people who were so severely impacted by superstorm sandy. one of our colleagues just a moment ago spoke about this nation being at a crossroads, and indeed, we crossed paths many, many times and there are many different crossroads. the people of pennsylvania, new jersey, new york, connecticut and other parts of this great nation here on the east coast, came to a crossroads. that crossroad
mean, you really think we must be doing terrible. we have higher payroll tax, a gridlock in washington, but the actual job growth is very out of sync, and it almost says like, listen, we got rid of this, let's start hiring. we may be looking at this debt ceiling, and i'm going to invoke shakespeare, the bard, that this may be much ado about nothing. i'm going there. right here. >> right now? the cliff is -- >> don't you love -- you know, when i first heard, i thought what a great title, i said no, moran, take the shakespeare course first the it's going to be claymation death match, maybe ufc, you and i watch that in our spare time -- not -- but i don't think it's as important as getting through the fiscal cliff. people are hiring again. >> dow transports continue to hit six-year highs. >> even as crude is up 95. >> it's like a market that has transport leadership. did you see union pacific? we had mike's southern on "mad money" he says point-blank, the hole has bottomed and is starting to go higher. and be good to the shutdowns, the coal plants. don't forget china has been burning coal
run and now they know what their tax situation is of for 2013 based on what happened in washington recently, and the ones work say i have nigh job, interest rates are low. it's not that bad. i want to take my vacation. >> susie: is business strong enough that you're going to add some jobs and what are your hiring plans? >> every time we launch a new ship, it brings on a lot more employees. we're 20,000 strong at this point. and if you think about there are a couple of thousand that come along with each new ship we're building in the future here. >> susie: kevin, thank you so much. great talking with you. >> appreciate it, take care. >> reporter: still ahead, more than half a million people are expected to converge on washington this weekend for the president's inauguration. we'll take a look at the economic impact. >> tom: u.s. stocks were little changed, despite a big jump in growth in china. china's economy rose by nearly 8% during the last three months of 2012, up half a percent from the previous quarter. still, for the year, china's posted its weakest annual performance since t
financing. they are doing a great job. they did not raise taxes. in addition, we have a very business friendly atmosphere. if you come to texas, we will not pull the rug out from under your feet. connell: businesses, sometimes individuals, sometimes larger businesses are leaving state than going to others mostly because of taxes. how much of that juicy and texas in texas and what industries is a really predominate. >> we do not have an income tax. that is a powerful magnet. they do not expect us to go ahead and spend beyond our means. they, in because of the business atmosphere and because we like visitors. a friendly place. the idea of getting to the numbers that you talked about during the first part of the interview and getting through the projections that this particular group put out that this $9 billion gap, specifically, how do you get there sure mark where did the cuts come from? >> i do not know where that number came. there will be a supplemental appropriations bill which we filed in a few weeks. they will fill some of the medicaid that we do not have. it is available in the
and costs were pretty moderate in the fourth quarter, and i think with the -- with the change in the taxes that came through in january, usually better for staples than consumer discretionaries so hopefully we'll get good numbers from there. >> where would you be investing, peter sorrentino? you said you like the early cyclicals? what does that mean? who do you like here? >> well, really it's a wide brush right now. we like refiners, the volero of the world. marathon petroleum spun out. that's an opportunity and agriculture, companies like lindsey, adco. do like the brazilian market. the real suffered last year so a lot of companies are on sale, cozian and volley, after great opportunities for investors, considering we've got a strong theme in the emerging markets that will continue this year. >> peter, thanks for joining us, rick as always, andres and christian come back when you can stay longer. >> i will. thank you very much. >> see you later. less than an hour finishing off what's been a pretty good week for the bulls on wall street. bob pisani has been in the middle of the action and
taxes at the end of the year. what did people do? they sold stock in december. they rolled forward bonus income. about 100 billion of income was taken in december. that money is being reinvested of the a lot of that money has been going into the market. we've seen 22 billion go into u.s. equity mutual fund and etfs. the most in a while. there is even a positive influence to u.s. equity mutual funds, if it lasts through the month, that would be the first inflow since february of 11. liz: that is good. >> yes, there are some positive things. extra money going into the economy has helped. people feel good about it but there is a problem lying in the weeds or woods, whatever, and that is if the income was taken last year, that means income this quarter is going to be down year-over-year you even get to the higher tax rates that are kicking in now. so we're going to have a problem in terms of comparisons both year-over-year and sequentially going forward here. income growth, take-home pay for people, unless there is a phenomenal pickup somewhere in the economy and certainly not real estate un
that was good risk/reward. on the dividend theme i think our call was that the tax rate wasn't going to rise the way it was written in the law. we have seen that and this is a pretty compelling group of stocks. you have low payout and bond rates are low so you can buy dividend stocks that yield well relative total attorney difficults in the bond market. on the megacap stocks you have a lot of large high quality american companies that should be able to grow at or higher than the rate of the market or cheaper than the market and also have those higher dividends. >> susie: and the other two sectors that you also recommend to your morgan stanley clients, health care, companies like cardinal health, and industrials like honeywell, general motors what is the story there? >> well, for health care look, when you want to be a little defensive in the markets's natural for people to think about two sectors, health care and staples. we really like health care more than staples right now. we see that pretty clearly. health-care companies are beating estimates more, they have higher cash balances and you
taxes. the airline says the suit's claims are untrue. >>> students at the university of vermont should not bring bottled water had they return to campus because the school has banned its sale for environmental reasons. vermont is the largest public university to prohibit bottled water sales on campus. they've even converted water fountains to bottle-filling stations. >>> over to wall street this tuesday morning. the dow opens the day at 13,507 after adding 18 points yesterday. the s&p and nasdaq were both down. overseas the nikkei gained 77 points but the hang seng fell 31. >>> the nasdaq and the s&p slipped monday thanks to worries that apple has gone sour. shares of the tech titan dipped below 500 for the first time in nearly a year after reports the company has cut orders for iphone parts due to weak demand. >>> meanwhile, pc maker dell surged 13% on fresh takeover talk. after the bell, fed chief ben bernanke praised washington's recent fiscal cliff deal which he said probably would have caused a recession this year. but he cautioned, quote, we are not out of the woods yet, calling
adjust to smaller paychecks due to higher taxes. >> the hit to incomes are going to be a first quarter event for the most part, so much of that effect will be felt in the first quarter and it gradually dissipate in our view as the year wears on. >> reporter: so, what will it take for the economy to return to much stronger footing. many say the answer lies with the housing market, which needs to built a stronger foundation. that brings us back to lenane and one of her listings. it's a five bedroom condo with river views. it can be yours for $4.75 million. >> to be able to get 3,100 square feet in manhattan is a real rarity, especially the bedroom count because people are really having families and staying in the city. and, this apartment really speaks to that. so that's why we've had such great traffic. >> reporter: traffic maybe, but will it sell? perhaps if the economy continues to show fresh signs of life. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: disappointing. that describes the last quarterly financial performances from two of the country's biggest banks, bank of america and citi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)